Tag archive for Infectious Disease

Diseases of the past

History repeats itself: Diseases of the past back to haunt us

It’s not an exaggeration to say that vaccines have changed the world. Diseases like smallpox have been eliminated worldwide, and the United States remains polio free. Other diseases, such as mumps and rubella, have been reduced by more than 99 percent.

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Parker to present on global health security at international meetings in South Korea

Gerald Parker, vice president for public health preparedness and response at Texas A&M Health Science Center, is presenting at the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) high-level meeting and the Seoul Defense Dialogue meeting, both in Seoul, South Korea.

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Germ infested hospital bed

Combating deadly antibiotic-resistant infections: CDC says teamwork is key

Superbugs - germs that have evolved to become resistant to antibiotics and other medical treatments - are on the loose, infecting more than 2 million people in the U.S. every year.

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Photo of cow in pen

Parker named Interim Director of the Institute for Infectious Animal Diseases

Gerald Parker, DVM, Ph.D., M.S., vice president for public health preparedness and response at the Texas A&M Health Science Center, has been named Interim Director of the Institute for Infectious Animal Diseases.

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Health care professional in mask

Q&A: Why MERS matters

An outbreak of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has recently been reported in South Korea and China. Frightening, given that nearly thirty percent of those that contract the virus die and that in this age of air travel, any person – and the viruses he or she is carrying – can move across the world in a matter of hours.

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An Aedes japonicus mosquito has pierced human skin and is sucking blood.

Fast Facts: West Nile virus 101

The influx of rain this season has caused severe flooding across the Southeast, particularly in Texas and Oklahoma. Rushing water is dangerous, but when water stops moving, it creates the perfect breeding ground for something just as threatening: West Nile virus bearing mosquitoes.

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Man in PPE suit

Fast Facts: Anthrax 101

Anthrax is a serious infectious disease caused by a bacteria that can lie dormant in soil for decades. While anthrax occurs most often in humans handling animals (or animal products) infected with the bacteria, there have been several instances of anthrax being used as a bioterror agent. There has been a lull in anthrax coverage in recent years, but it remains an extremely dangerous bioterrorism weapon that should remain top of mind.

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Doctor treating a patient

Are we ready for another pandemic? Panel session explores strategies for readiness and resilience

The influenza pandemic of 2009 and more recent threats involving Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Ebola revealed national preparedness gaps, a topic explored extensively at the George H.W. Bush Sixth China-U.S. Relations Conference in Houston. Remedies are essential to avoid future high-consequence emergencies that could threaten large segments of our populations, economies and infrastructure.

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Public Health Preparedness in the Developing World: How do China and the U.S. Provide Leadership?

Public health threats know no boundaries, and global security depends upon preparedness and collaboration in establishing sustainable public health systems around the world, said a panel of high-ranking experts at the George H.W. Bush Sixth China-U.S. Relations Conference hosted by Texas A&M Health Science Center in Houston.

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