Vital Record https://news.tamhsc.edu Your source for health news from the Texas A&M Health Science Center Tue, 26 Aug 2014 21:44:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 McLeroy to present at Health Education & Behavior Editorial Board meeting https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=mcleroy-to-present-at-health-education-behavior-editorial-board-meeting https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=mcleroy-to-present-at-health-education-behavior-editorial-board-meeting#comments Tue, 26 Aug 2014 18:32:09 +0000 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=21152 Regents and Distinguished Professor Kenneth McLeroy, Ph.D., will deliver the keynote address at the Health Education & Behavior (HE&B) Editorial Board meeting and luncheon in New Orleans on November 17. ]]>

Regents and Distinguished Professor Kenneth McLeroy, Ph.D., will deliver the keynote address at the Health Education & Behavior (HE&B) Editorial Board meeting and luncheon in New Orleans on November 17.

Health Education & Behavior is a peer-reviewed bi-monthly journal that provides empirical research, case studies, program evaluations, literature reviews, and discussions on theories of health behavior and health status, as well as strategies to improve social and behavioral health. It also examines the processes of planning, implementing, managing, and assessing health education and social-behavioral interventions.

McLeroy will speak on his previously published work, “Creating Capacity: Establishing a Health Education Research Agenda,” published originally in 1995 that led to the establishment of a research agenda for health education. He will recount the history of that effort and address the issue of new journal reporting standards that go beyond the current standards for public health journals.

Kenneth McLeroy, Ph.D.

Kenneth McLeroy, Ph.D.

McLeroy currently serves as the department editor of Framing Health Matters for the American Journal of Public Health and is an international leader in the use of social ecology as a framework for public health research and practice. His research interests include community capacity, community-based approaches to health promotion and disease prevention, program evaluation of individual and community assets and resources, the relationship between theory and practice, social ecology, and history of public health.

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Stepping away from the textbook: A team-based approach to medicine https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=stepping-away-from-the-textbook-a-team-based-approach-to-medicine https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=stepping-away-from-the-textbook-a-team-based-approach-to-medicine#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:29:02 +0000 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=21132 As our health care system is transforming, it is important that the way we teach our future health care professionals transforms as well. Interprofessional education and team-based medicine are at the center of a growing movement of collaborative training among health professions students]]>
Teaching health professions students how to work and communicate together is a vital part of preparing them for real world experiences.

Teaching health professions students how to work and communicate together is a vital part of preparing them for real world experiences.

A mother rushes into the emergency department (ED), panic stricken by her infant’s high fever. Nurses console her, gathering what information she is able to relay, triage the child and order necessary testing. Pending those results, the ED physician wastes no time prescribing the necessary medication to stabilize the infant, the dosage of which a pharmacist calculates quickly and with precision—knowing that every milligram is crucial and too much can have potentially fatal consequences.

At every point, these professionals have to be cognizant of what the others are doing. Communication between the nurses, physicians and pharmacists has to be clear and efficient, because every second matters and any mistake could have severe repercussions.

Just reading about this scene would likely cause any parent’s pulse to race, but the good news is that this particular case resulted in a positive outcome for everyone involved. Featuring pharmacy, nursing and medical students, the neonatal sepsis simulation mentioned above is just one of the carefully staged scenarios conducted in the Texas A&M Health Science Center’s Clinical Learning Resource Center, a 27,000-square-foot, realistic hospital setting equipped with the latest tools and technology to enhance learning. The idea behind such multi-disciplinary simulations is simple, but vital: incorporate a team medicine approach to learning so health professions students are amply prepared for the realities of today’s health care setting.

“Team medicine is a concept that everyone—nurses, physicians and pharmacists—must employ in this day and age. Each health professional brings all of their knowledge, their specific understanding and training to the table, for the care of the patient,” said Jim Donovan, M.D., vice dean at the Texas A&M College of Medicine in Round Rock.

As research continues to show that issues with communication have a direct correlation with medical errors, interprofessional education, which is the method behind the team medicine approach to learning, is evolving as a medical education trend across the nation.

“Interprofessional education brings more of the ‘real world experiences’ into students’ training. It allows them to learn more about different disciplines so that they can work together efficiently and appreciate one another’s skills,” said Mary Chavez, Pharm.D., interim vice dean and chair of pharmacy practice at Texas A&M Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy. “With this newfound perspective on the bigger picture of patient care, providers can leverage collaborative knowledge to enhance outcomes.”

Traditionally, health professions curricula were taught in a fairly siloed approach, where students learned the fundamentals of a specific discipline, but gained limited knowledge of other’s functions in a real-world health care setting. Collaborative learning is aimed at breaking down those barriers and providing students with an understanding of the different training each profession undergoes, while simultaneously teaching students how to communicate clearly with one another.

“Before the idea of interprofessional education emerged, the first time that nurses, pharmacists and physicians interacted with each other was in the field—and they had no previous experience to draw upon as they quickly tried to learn how best to work together,” said Jerry Livingston, Ph.D., assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Nursing. Livingston helps coordinate Texas A&M Health Science Center’s annual Disaster Day, an event that brings together nursing, medical and pharmacy students in a simulated disaster.

Disaster Day prepares students for a challenge they may encounter during their health careers, teaching them how to handle a high volume of patients and communicate effectively in a high-stakes environment

Disaster Day prepares students for a challenge they may encounter during their health careers, teaching them how to handle a high volume of patients and communicate effectively in a high-stakes environment.

Similar to staged simulation sessions in the Clinical Learning Resource Center, Disaster Day provides students with a realistic disaster that will broaden their scope of training. While extreme, the yearly event prepares students for a challenge they may encounter during their health careers, teaching them how to handle a high volume of patients and communicate effectively in a high-stakes environment.

Kept secret until the day of the event, the disaster scenario is almost exclusively selected and prepared for by students. While faculty members are present during the event, they take more of an observatory role, allowing students to evaluate and care for patients on their own.

“It allows students from different disciplines to become comfortable communicating with each other, because ultimately that is what they’ll have to do in their future careers,” Livingston stated. “If one student is concerned about the safety of a patient, they need to be able to communicate that concern in an effective manner to both the patient and the other health professionals who are onsite.”

While mock emergency simulations are obvious examples of interdisciplinary education, they are far from the only efforts to promote collaborative learning among disciplines. The Texas A&M College of Nursing offers a TeamSTEPPS elective, which stands for Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety. Developed by the military, TeamSTEPPS teaches students effective and efficient ways to remember common hospital procedures, such as transferring a patient, and tactics for effectively communicating with others.

There is no doubt that interprofessional education and team medicine will play a greater role in the future of health care. “Interprofessional training is a trend of the future that needs to happen,” Chavez stated. “Many institutions are recognizing the importance and benefit of training students of various professions together from early on and there has been a greater push for including more collaborative learning opportunities in curricula. In fact, many licensing boards are now encouraging schools to implement interprofessional education.”

Some lessons simply can’t be taught in the textbooks, like how to work together to improve patient outcomes.  Future Aggie health care professionals are being taught the collaborative real-world skills they need to excel before entering the workforce. “Frankly, medicine has always been a team sport,” said Donovan. “And the most effective physicians, nurses and pharmacists have always recognized the importance of working together. If they can’t practice as a team during education, how can we expect them to do that on real-world playing fields—hospitals and clinics around the nation?”

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Managing your child’s ADHD https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=managing-your-childs-adhd https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=managing-your-childs-adhd#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 15:08:53 +0000 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=21117 Getting back into the school routine can be a stressful time for any child, let alone those with learning or behavioral disorders. For children with ADHD, it can be difficult to focus in class. Managing your child's ADHD is a crucial step towards helping your child succeed in school]]>
For children with ADHD, it can be difficult to focus in class. Managing your child's ADHD is a necessary step for helping your child succeed in school.

For children with ADHD, it can be difficult to focus in class. Managing your child’s ADHD is a necessary step for helping your child succeed in school.

The start of a new school year has arrived, and getting your child into their school routine after a summer of sleeping late and enjoying the freedoms from strict schedules and homework can be stressful, especially for children with learning or behavioral disorders.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), formerly referred to as attention deficit disorder (ADD), is a common childhood disorder that can continue into adulthood. Children with ADHD can be impulsive, hyperactive and have trouble focusing, making it difficult to discern if your child has ADHD or is simply “being a kid.”

“It is normal for children to have trouble focusing and behaving at one time or another; however, children with ADHD do not just grow out of these behaviors,” said Rebecca Burns, D.N.P. (c), M.S.N., R.N., clinical assistant professor at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Nursing, who specializes in pediatric-related health and wellness.

The good news is that by working with a pediatrician to identify proper treatment, children with ADHD don’t have to been negatively impacted by the behavioral disorder. Burns offers the following advice for recognizing and managing your child’s disorder.

Establish a relationship with your child’s teacher

Being involved with your child’s school life can keep you aware of their behaviors outside the home and will help you determine whether or not they are exhibiting traits associated with ADHD at school.

“During the school year, it’s not uncommon for teachers to see your child more than you do in a day,” said Burns. “They will recognize if your child is having trouble concentrating or sitting still during class.”

If you are concerned that your child may have ADHD you can work with your school counselor, who will be able to guide you through the testing process or refer you to a specialist and work with your physician.

Understand the examination process

Diagnosing ADHD involves a comprehensive examination.  In order to get the correct referrals, contacting your primary care physician or pediatrician, who will then guide you through the process of testing and diagnosing your child, is an important first step. According to Burns, the examination will include interviews with the parents and the teachers separately and an evaluation of the child. If both parties report the same behaviors and symptoms in the child, the physician will then determine the type of ADHD your child has and what treatment plan is best for him or her.

The physician may first conduct a physical exam and gather family history, inquiring about any medications your child is currently on, their past health concerns, along with previous familial health concerns. Since some emotional conditions such as stress, depression and anxiety can cause the same behaviors in your child, the physician may ask you to fill out a questionnaire to rule out those conditions. During this process, it is important to be as honest as possible so that your child can be accurately diagnosed and treated.

There are three ways ADHD can manifest itself:

1. Predominantly hyperactive-impulsive: These are the children that just can’t seem to sit still. They engage in impulsive behaviors such as interrupting people or talking during inappropriate times.

2. Predominantly inattentive: Children who have this kind of ADHD are considered the “daydreamers.” They find it difficult to organize and finish a task. Children who are predominantly inattentive will find it harder to remember and complete daily routines, because they are easily distracted.

3. Combined presentation: As its name suggests, a child with combined presentation will display symptoms from both the hyperactive-impulsive and the inattentive types of ADHD.

Find the right treatment

ADHD can’t be cured, but it can be successfully managed. Finding the best way to manage your child’s ADHD is possibly the most time-consuming and exhausting part of the journey, but once the right treatment is found, it can be a great stress reliever. Medication is the most common form of treatment that may help your child focus in and out of the classroom.

There are three kinds of medications that are generally prescribed to treat ADHD:

  • Stimulants have a wide range of dosages; some may require multiple doses per day, while others can last up to 12 hours. The side effects associated with stimulants are decreased appetite, stomachache, irritability and insomnia.
  • Nonstimulants are an alternative to stimulants or may be used with stimulants. The dosages typically last longer than stimulants and are associated with fewer side effects.
  • Antidepressants are sometimes used to treat ADHD. However, antidepressants can pose an increased risk to suicide in children and teens. Be sure to discuss the side effects with your physician if antidepressants are considered to treat your child’s ADHD.

Be prepared for many trials and errors as you work with your pediatrician on the path to finding the correct medication. While your child is trying a new medication or dosage, be sure to monitor their behavior. If they become more hyperactive or start sleeping most of the day, contact your physician about trying a different medication. “The correct medication and dosage should leave your child in a happy medium between overactive and lethargic,” Burns advised.

Aside from medication, psychotherapy is another way to help your child manage their disorder. “Psychotherapy allows children to organize their thoughts and gives them the tools necessary to remember tasks and ultimately help them manage their ADHD,” Burns said.

Therapy won’t “cure” your child, but it may help them better manage their condition. Behavioral therapy can teach your child how to create a routine, and utilize different strategies for organizing and provide tools to avoid distractions. Therapy can also give you tips on how to organize your house and other tactics to help manage your child’s ADHD.

Typically, the most effective treatment is a combination of medications and therapy. Work with your physician to see what kind or balance of treatment is right for your child.

Remember, no one knows your child better than you, so be active about finding the best treatment plan.

Be your child’s advocate

“Having ADHD is far from the end of your child’s academic and professional career. There are many successful individuals—doctors, musicians and celebrities—who have ADHD and are able to manage their condition,” Burns said. Your child will still be able to pursue whatever aspirations they develop, but they will need your help finding the right tools to keep their ADHD under control.

Whether it’s making sure your physician finds the right treatment option, or ensuring that your child is receiving proper accommodations in the classroom, you are your child’s primary advocate. “Parents need to make sure that their child is getting the right treatment and given fair opportunities in the classroom,” said Burns. “Especially early on, when they can’t stand up for themselves.”

Be active in your child’s life and establish relationships with your child’s physician, therapist and teachers. See if your area provides and support groups or parent education courses that can give you better insight on how to help your child succeed.

For more information on ADHD symptoms, testing and treatments, please visit the National Institute of Mental Health.

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Wells to present research at AcademyHealth Public Health Systems Research Close-Up Briefing https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=wells-to-present-research-at-academyhealth-public-health-systems-research-close-up-briefing https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=wells-to-present-research-at-academyhealth-public-health-systems-research-close-up-briefing#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 13:56:51 +0000 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=21122 Rebecca Wells, Ph.D. was invited to present and discuss her research at a Public Health Systems Research Close-Up Briefing conducted by AcademyHealth in Washington ]]>
Rebecca Wells, Ph.D.

Rebecca Wells, Ph.D.

Rebecca Wells, Ph.D., professor of Health Policy Management at the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health, was recently invited to present and discuss her research, Effects of Reduced Medicaid Funding for Maternity Outreach and Postpartum Services, at a Public Health Systems Research Close-Up Briefing conducted by AcademyHealth in Washington, D.C. in October.

Public health systems research examines the financing, organization, and delivery of public health services within communities and how these services impact health outcomes, with the goal of informing public health policy decision-makers about the evolving public health system.

The briefing will bring together experts from public health research, practice, and policy, and will be an interactive exchange of ideas, questions, and evidence. This particular session focuses on research of maternal and child health, including the impact of recent funding reductions and policy changes on maternal and child health outcomes. The goal of this meeting is to share the latest research on maternal and child health policy, and improve the effectiveness, relevance, and accessibility of public health systems research to make it more useful for public health policy-makers.

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Bustillos secures national public health research poster presentation https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=bustillos-secures-national-public-health-research-poster-presentation https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=bustillos-secures-national-public-health-research-poster-presentation#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 13:42:33 +0000 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=21119 Brenda Bustillos, M.S., RD, LD was selected as one of 19 people nationwide for the Delta Omega National Honorary Society in Public Health research poster presentations at the American Public Health Association (APHA) annual meeting]]>
Brenda Bustillos, M.S., RD, LD

Brenda Bustillos, M.S., RD, LD

Brenda Bustillos, M.S., RD, LD, a doctoral student at the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health, was selected as one of 19 people nationwide for the Delta Omega National Honorary Society in Public Health research poster presentations at the American Public Health Association (APHA) annual meeting November 17 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Six out of the past seven consecutive years one or more Texas A&M School of Public Health Students have had research posters selected for this prestigious honor.

A captain in the U.S. Army Medical Specialist Corps, Bustillos is completing her Dr.P.H. in Health Promotion and Community Health Sciences. Her winning research poster is titled, “Development and implementation of a culturally and linguistically-centered nutrition education program for promotora researchers to foster community health education and outreach in Texas border colonias.”

Earlier this spring, Bustillos won first place with her poster in the Texas A&M School of Public Health 9th Annual Research Poster Symposium and Student Poster Contest.

“We are very pleased that Brenda’s outstanding work can be showcased on the national scale at the APHA meeting,” remarked Jean Brender, RN, Ph.D., associate dean for research.

This opportunity was created by Delta Omega to encourage and recognize the public health leaders of tomorrow.

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INFOGRAPHIC: Managing the next public health outbreak https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=infographic-managing-the-next-public-health-outbreak https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=infographic-managing-the-next-public-health-outbreak#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 19:18:45 +0000 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=21091 Ebola virus disease is a stark reminder that an outbreak anywhere can be a risk everywhere. This is both the harsh reality and the shining truth, but more than just managing this outbreak, we must learn from it and vow to prevent the next one by overcoming social, scientific and economic barriers that inhibit effective public health preparedness and response. ]]>

Roadmap_ManagingOutbreaks_VitalRecord

View the full article.

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Editorial: Call for a roadmap to manage the Ebola (or the next public health) outbreak https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=editorial-call-for-a-roadmap-to-manage-the-ebola-or-the-next-public-health-outbreak https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=editorial-call-for-a-roadmap-to-manage-the-ebola-or-the-next-public-health-outbreak#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 19:16:10 +0000 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=21097 Dr. Gerald Parker, vice president for public health preparedness and response, offers a roadmap for managing the next Ebola, or any global public health threat, whether naturally occurring or a deliberate attack. ]]>

As the Ebola virus infiltrates communities throughout West Africa, fears of a global epidemic are even more rampant than the pathogen itself; and facts surrounding the current outbreak only add fuel to the fear. With no approved vaccine or treatment, resulting in up to a 90 percent fatality rate recorded in past outbreaks, the virus has killed more than 1,300 people and infected more than 2,400 across Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), these reported numbers are actually much worse, leading to the epidemic being declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Despite the sobering numbers, there is hope that the outbreak will be stopped at its source in Africa, but it will not be easy and it will take many months. We will have to overcome new challenges; and through global partnerships we will need to embrace new responsibilities. Ebola virus disease is a stark reminder that an outbreak anywhere can be a risk everywhere. This is both the harsh reality and the shining truth, but more than just managing this outbreak, we must learn from it and vow to prevent the next one by overcoming social, scientific and economic barriers that inhibit effective public health preparedness and response. Not an easy task, but absolutely attainable with the right global partners all driving a long-term strategy; actually not just a strategy…rather, a roadmap for managing the next Ebola, or any global public health threat, whether naturally occurring or a deliberate attack.

Public health measures for short-term control
The first leg of this journey will require implementation of proper infection control measures and sustained public health capacity building in Africa and elsewhere, a step already in progress with the CDC’s efforts in combination with the WHO’s, and other partners, through the Global Health Security Agenda. Make no mistake, more lives will be lost in the meantime and there are many challenges to overcome in order to bring the Ebola outbreak in West Africa under control, but this outbreak will not reach pandemic proportions. Industrialized countries, including the United States, have the public health and medical infrastructure in place to reduce the possibility of rampant disease transmission. By isolating patients who have become ill and implementing public health measures such as disease tracking and education to help identify and ensure the early reporting of new cases, medical and health authorities can limit exposure within the population.

Establish the need for a long-term response
Looking several months down the road, for many, Ebola will be a somewhat distant memory. However, that is exactly the mindset that we must avoid. Tenacity means the difference between an isolated incident and a full-on outbreak. Until now, sustained interest has not existed. Public health and policy officials have previously noted episodic cases, but development of a vaccine and therapies has not remained top of mind. The death toll in previous outbreaks has remained relatively small, but clearly not so with the latest outbreak. However, blame cannot be placed on a mere lack of attention. The reality remains that until the outbreak in West Africa, the accepted belief was that Ebola could be combated through traditional hospital infection control, isolation, and contract tracing; yet those controls only work when implemented correctly. Combine a lack of public health infrastructure with large, nomadic populations and an added layer of local customs involving the handling of bodies, and the accepted belief no longer applies. Sustained support for the Global Health Security Agenda is one component of the long-term response. Additionally, even in developed countries where effective public health infrastructure is in place, therapeutic capacity building is necessary to address the current lack of vaccines and therapeutics needed by our global partners, but also for the potential national security risks that could arise as a result of bioterror threats. Consequently, the need for a vaccine or therapy, which will both protect frontline health care providers who deploy into harm’s way and safeguard the global population from this deady virus, has been established.

Advance vaccine discoveries
Attention now turns to where vaccine research currently stands. There have been a number of medical countermeasure research and development efforts in this realm for over two decades, but there are only a few Ebola vaccine candidates that have moved beyond discovery and into early development, with only a few antibody and antiviral candidates in early development, too. The National Institute of Health (NIH) recently announced plans to fast-track an experimental Ebola vaccine candidate, which – if proven safe and effective – could be available under limited, emergency-use protocols to health care workers in affected areas as early as 2015. However, much more work is needed to determine if this, and other vaccine candidates can illicit an effective immune response with an acceptable safety profile, and can be scaled-upped for production under exacting manufacturing standards. So how could the global scientific community find itself this far behind the curve? Fact number one: There has not been a market for the vaccine in the past, so the number of researchers focused in this area prior to the outbreak is relatively small. Fact number two: Obtaining licensure required to use these products is difficult, and developing these particular types of vaccines is challenging because testing a therapeutic for something as serious as Ebola rarely presents the opportunity for clinical trials in humans. Fact number three: The two aforementioned facts do not make for an economically viable product to take from “bench to bedside” without sustained public sector and international partner support. So we previously lacked the interest, now we lack sufficient science and technology advancement in this area, and it is highly likely that even with both of those factors resolved, we will continue to lack the funding to bring life-saving Ebola therapeutics to market. It may sound bleak, but remember, we are laying a roadmap and we are still en route.

Bridge the manufacturing gap
The challenge of discovering new vaccines is hard enough, but moving them beyond early development into production presents another speed bump in the form of scalability for manufacturing. Until now, this hurdle created a valley of death for countless revolutionary vaccines and therapeutics; however, thanks to vested interest in domestic manufacturing capabilities from the government and industry partners, Texas is now home to one of only three biodefense centers in the nation standing ready to offer an economically viable, near-immediate response to produce life-saving vaccines for the next global public health threat – whether naturally occurring or in a scenario where the pathogen is used as a weapon in a bioterror attack. Without the flexible and adaptive manufacturing technologies made available by the Texas-based, Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority-sponsored center, there is no bridge between the science behind Ebola therapeutics and communities in need of life-saving vaccines, no matter the underlying cause. With the capabilities of such a unique public-private entity and implementation of the necessary steps to ensure public health preparedness and response, the United States will be ready to serve as that bridge on the roadmap to our final destination: Surviving and managing the next outbreak, no matter what form it might take. We just need to make sure we are all reading from the same map in the meantime.

Contributed by Dr. Gerald Parker, vice president for public health preparedness and response at the Texas A&M Health Science Center.

View an infographic for a quick snapshot of the priorities outlined above.

 

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Operation Lone Star 2014 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=operation-lone-star-2014 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=operation-lone-star-2014#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 18:37:57 +0000 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=21098 Students from Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry joined the ranks of military and medical personnel to serve thousands in this full-scale emergency response exercise]]>

02connections-ols.jpgIn the waning weeks of summer break, disaster loomed along the Texas-Mexico border. Sort of. A massive cohort of military, medical and volunteer personnel descended upon the Rio Grande Valley Aug. 4 to 8, where they responded to a simulated bioterrorism threat with a medical countermeasure dispensing operation.

Created as a full-scale emergency response exercise, Operation Lone Star provides free health services to local residents at five sites located in four different counties in South Texas. Students and faculty from Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry were a part of the event, now in its 16th year.

A vast collaborative effort of Texas county and state public health professionals, the operation is comprised of Texas Military Forces, U.S. military personnel, the Remote Area Medical Volunteer Corps and hundreds of volunteers, including faculty and 36 dental and dental hygiene students from Texas A&M Baylor College of Dentistry.

The experience is not for the faint of heart. Hopeful patients arrive in the middle of the night, waiting until dawn in lines that snake around the building. By 10 a.m. on Aug. 4, the first day of the weeklong event, the Palmview High School site in Mission, Texas, where TAMBCD students worked had already accepted 537 patients for medical, dental or vision appointments that day.

In total, volunteer dentists and dental students saw an estimated 737 patients at the high school throughout the week. A total of 2,948 patients received health care services at that single site.

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Medical students participate in inaugural Aggies Invent https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=medical-students-participate-in-inaugural-aggies-invent https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=medical-students-participate-in-inaugural-aggies-invent#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 21:07:20 +0000 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=21083 Medical students recently participated in the inaugural Aggies Invent, which promotes innovation and an entrepreneurial mindset among engineering and medical students at Texas A&M University. ]]>

The Engineering Academic and Student Affairs (EASA) office, with the help of several sponsors, recently hosted the inaugural Aggies Invent, a program that promotes innovation and an entrepreneurial mindset among students at Texas A&M University. The concept is to gather interested students, provide them with potential needs (medical, energy, or others), allow them to self-select teams, give them access to and support from the EIC, and have them create prototypes in 48 hours. The focus of this particular Aggies Invent was medical needs and wearable electronics.

There were 42 engineering students and five medical students who participated in the event. This diversity allowed teams to collaborate with one another in order to successfully create a prototype. Participating medical students included: Cara Buskmiller, Yusuf Chauhan, Andrew Davis, Yen-Nan Lin and Cullen Soares.

Photo of the first place team from Aggies Invent

The first place team, Under Control, consisting of Cara Buskmiller, fourth-year medical student, Walter Pospick, computer science sophomore, Nicholas Taluzek, aerospace engineering senior from Illinois Institute of Technology who had previously participated in the summer Texas A&M Undergraduate Research program, Amy Li, mechanical engineering sophomore, and John Gonzalez, mechanical engineering junior, received the top prize of $750 for creating a wearable device based on a need statement provided by Baylor Scott & White to help people successfully exercise their pelvic floor muscle in order to prevent incontinence.

Photo of the second place team from Aggies Invent

Team Good Baby consisting of Yusuf Chauhan, first-year medical student, Sean Whitney, aerospace engineering junior, Duanduan Han, chemical engineering graduate student, Gabriel Aguilar, aerospace engineering junior, and Daniel Whitten, mechanical engineering senior, was given a $500 check for second place for their project that uses geo-fencing in order to let people know that an infant has been left in a hot car. This project also focused on a need statement furnished by Baylor Scott and White.

For more information on the event, visit the Texas A&M College of Engineering’s website.

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