Research

Young girl with an inhaler.

High childhood asthma rates spur research on prenatal air pollutant exposure in South Texas

An increase in industrial expansion and trade has led to higher air pollution along the Texas-Mexico border. Astounding childhood asthma rates in Hidalgo County - among the highest in the state - and research linking childhood asthma to prenatal exposure to air pollution has prompted a team of Texas A&M Health Science Center researchers to dig deeper into the issue with an end-goal of developing intervention strategies to combat the adverse effects of air pollution.

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Geriatric nurse caring for an older woman

Texas A&M Health Science Center advancing Alzheimer’s disease research as coordinating center for new statewide grant program

The TARCC is comprised of six Texas medical research institutions, including Texas A&M Health Science Center, all working together to advance scientific initiatives aimed at halting the disease in its tracks. One such initiative is a new grant program administered by TAMHSC that encourages utilization of TARCC’s extensive patient cohort.

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Harnessing Anxiety: Research looks for optimal performance in health care

In a series of research studies, College of Nursing faculty members have teamed together to find out what can be done for nursing students to be at their best for optimal learning and performance.

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Carolyn Cannon, M.D., Ph.D., pediatric pulmonologist and associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine

Wielding Nature’s Sword: Researchers at Texas A&M discover new treatments against drug-resistant infections

Since World War II, antibiotics have been our only defense against bacterial infection, but overuse and misuse have caused some bacteria to develop resistance to antibiotics. Now, researchers at Texas A&M Health Science Center have discovered an entirely new class of antimicrobials that have the potential to kill drug-resistant bacteria.

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Nursing student helps young boy.

New drug boosts immune system to protect against world’s deadliest infectious diseases

Researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center (TAMHSC) and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have developed a new therapy to stimulate the body’s natural immune system, thereby providing effective protection against a wide range of life-threatening infectious diseases.

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Researchers at Texas A&M investigate “the pharmacy inside our bodies” for autoimmunity treatments

Researchers at Texas A&M investigate “the pharmacy inside our bodies” for autoimmunity treatments

The benefits of healthy gut bacteria and microbes have surged into the public consciousness over the past several years. Now, researchers at Texas A&M are on the cusp of developing therapeutics derived from gut bacteria to treat a number of ailments, including autoimmune disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and even cancer.

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Q&A: Tuberculosis: Not just a disease of the past

Q&A: Tuberculosis: Not just a disease of the past

With nine million new cases appearing every year, tuberculosis (TB) is far from a disease of the past. We sat down with Jeffrey Cirillo, Ph.D., professor at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, who has spent the last 28 years researching tuberculosis, to find out more about one of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases.

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Sally Ward

Husband and wife research duo join Texas A&M, advance novel protein engineering research to combat cancer

The age-old saying still holds true: Two heads are better than one, at least for the newest research team at Texas A&M. Elizabeth Sally Ward Ober, Ph.D., a molecular immunologist, and her husband, Raimund J. Ober, Ph.D., a biomedical engineer, have joined the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine and Dwight Look College of Engineering at Texas A&M University, respectively.

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Elder Native Alaskan woman

Towne and Ory identify health disparities among older American Indian and Alaska Native populations

Despite recommendations for breast and colorectal cancer screenings among the Medicare population, preventive screening rates are often lower among vulnerable populations such as the small but rapidly growing older American Indian and Alaska Native population. Two School of Public Health researchers published a study that identifies potential disparities in this population.

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