Vital Record » Public Health http://news.tamhsc.edu Your source for health news from the Texas A&M Health Science Center Wed, 01 Jul 2015 17:01:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 When “healthy” is unhealthy: Tips for making the right choice at the store http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=when-healthy-is-unhealthy-tips-for-making-the-right-choice-at-the-store http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=when-healthy-is-unhealthy-tips-for-making-the-right-choice-at-the-store#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 13:00:50 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23276 Take a stroll around your local grocery store and it’s evident that healthy is “in.” As the public becomes more aware that overall health starts with what we put into our bodies, food producers and manufacturers have begun marketing their products with enticing labels such as “good source of fiber,” “low fat” and “sugar free.” While these words seem like good indicators that we’re making health-conscious choices, they can also be red herrings]]>

Take a stroll around your local grocery store and it’s evident that healthy is “in.” As the public becomes more aware that overall health starts with what we put into our bodies, food producers and manufacturers have begun marketing their products with enticing labels such as “good source of fiber,” “low fat” and “sugar free.” While these words seem like good indicators that we’re making health-conscious choices, they can also be red herrings.

“It can be frustrating to wade through all of the misinformation about nutrition and selecting healthy foods when you’re at the store,” said Brenda Bustillos, registered dietitian nutritionist (R.D.N.) and doctoral candidate at the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health. “Many people look at these words and think that they’re making nutritious choices, but sometimes these foods have a better reputation than they should.”

To help you sort through all of those confusing and misleading labels, Bustillos offers the following criteria for evaluating if a “healthy” food is actually nutritious.

A bowl of granola cereal, with berries on top

Even seemingly healthy foods can be loaded with sugar or fats. When deciding if a particular food is healthy or not, look at the nutrition label to see if its contents align with your nutritional goals.

Keep it natural

“When in doubt, the healthiest food is its most natural, least processed form,” Bustillos said. Whenever you can, buy fresh fruit and vegetables to use in your meals.

When considering more processed foods, take a look at the ingredients section.

“The first ingredient listed is the largest component in the product. For example, if the one of first ingredient in a loaf of bread is something like high-fructose corn syrup—even if the packaging claims to be multigrain or something equally healthy sounding—then you know that it’s probably not the most nutritious item on the shelves,” Bustillos explained.

Processed food tends to add a lot of preservatives, like sodium, to extend the shelf life of the product. It’s an unfortunate trade-off, but the more natural (and nutritious) options are more perishable.

For breads and grains, try to look for 100 percent whole-wheat options; these items will have whole wheat listed as their primary ingredient. Take the time to see what ingredients are going into your foods and, ultimately, your body. You may be surprised that the main ingredient isn’t what you think.

Beware of those “healthy” words

It’s hard to walk down a grocery aisle without the phrases “low fat” and “sugar free” jumping out at you. Naturally, we gravitate towards these appealing words, thinking that they’re healthier than their regular counterparts, but these products could be just as unhealthy.

“Usually with products that advertise that they’re low in some undesirable ingredient, the product is subsidized with another ingredient to make it taste the same as the regular option. If you’re not careful, you could be consuming more sugar, fat or sodium than if you’d bought the regular item,” Bustillos cautioned.

Always check the nutrition label

Some foods have received the reputation of being “health foods,” without having any significant nutrition. Always look at the nutrition label of any food you buy, even if you think it’s healthy.

Those energy and protein bars you might pick up to fuel your workouts, or the granola you munch on as a snack, could actually be sugar bombs. Try to select foods with low sugar and sodium content, and avoid foods with high amounts of saturated and trans fats.

Bustillos also recommends keeping an eye on serving sizes. One of the most common mistakes is thinking an appropriate serving is larger than it actually is. This could lead to consuming more than your body actually requires.

“Just because a food is marketed as and believed to be healthy, doesn’t mean it is. Know exactly what you’re buying before putting it into your body,” Bustillos said.

For more tips on selecting the right options at the store and meeting your nutritional needs, visit the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ website or meet with a R.D.N. in your area.

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Behavioral health interventions: The importance of communication and new technology http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=behavioral-health-interventions-the-importance-of-communication-and-new-technology http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=behavioral-health-interventions-the-importance-of-communication-and-new-technology#comments Fri, 26 Jun 2015 13:00:11 +0000 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=20642 As we move toward a more patient-centered form of health care and physicians begin to focus more on specific patient behaviors it has become all the more evident that patient lifestyle choices contribute significantly to our overall health. ]]>
woman in a doctor's office, being shown a health app on a smartphone by her health care provider

Recent studies show mobile devices as a positive means of collecting information from patients and improving communication between provider and patient.

As we move toward a more patient-centered form of health care, health care providers now are beginning to focus more on specific patient behaviors and how lifestyle contributes to overall health. This makes transparency and effective communication between patients and physicians an essential component to a doctor’s ability to provide quality care.

“Unfortunately, patients as well as doctors can be leery of discussing particular topics they are either uncomfortable with or that are of a sensitive nature,” says Regents and Distinguished Professor Marcia G. Ory, Ph.D., with the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health. “Some topics may even cause patients to become defensive when questioned about them, such as substance abuse, eating disorders, or mental health.”

Ory notes that clinicians are sometimes reluctant to bring up emotional health issues for fear that they won’t have time to respond. In reality, not dealing with such issues is often counterproductive because anxious or depressed patients often have more trouble managing their health conditions and end up taking more of a clinician’s time.

So how do clinicians bring up need-to-alter behaviors in a way that is motivating and non-judgmental?

This is the question behind new research regarding strategies health care providers can implement to encourage open communication and collaboration with patients.

Marcia G. Ory, Ph.D., regents and distinguished professor at Texas A&M School of Public Health.

Marcia G. Ory, Ph.D., regents and distinguished professor at Texas A&M School of Public Health.

Recent studies have emphasized the use of mobile devices as a means of collecting information from patients. As mobile devices have flooded daily use, they have become increasingly popular as a way to increase patient-physician communication. With the help of new research, these innovative technologies are now being used as a way to collect and analyze patient data securely, define patient goals, create support networks, and monitor health improvement progress.

Recently, Ory,  Yan Alicia Hong, Ph.D., associate professor at the Texas A&M School of Public Health, and several other researchers at Baylor Scott and White HealthCare published an article online in the Journal of Medical Internet Research Mhealth and Uhealth on the use of mobile devices by primary care physicians and their patients. This particular study examined the usability of mobile devices to promote healthy behaviors and chronic disease prevention for such health issues as diabetes and obesity.

In “Using the iPod touch for Patient Health Behavior Assessment and Health Promotion in Primary Care,” researchers concluded that patients were able to complete a health behavior assessment from their doctor’s office using the iPod touch with relative ease. In addition, researchers found that when physicians engaged their patients on the report generated by the assessment, patients were much more likely to put into practice the behavioral changes suggested by their physicians than those who did not. This tool provided patients with the opportunity to engage with their physician in a one-on-one setting, while receiving individualized healthcare suggestions that facilitate effective behavioral change.

“The vast majority of patients found the device extremely user-friendly,” said Samuel N. Forjuoh, Dr.P.H., M.D., Ph.D., the principal investigator of the project. “In addition, the iPod touch minimizes survey response error, is reliable in eliciting sensitive data in a private and confidential manner, provides easy data storage and transportation, and is a promising device to assist behavioral change within a diverse population of varying age groups, genders, ethnicities, and health status.”

The ways through which clinicians practice health care continues to change. Knowing a patient’s behavior patterns and emotional state can create better informed physicians and allow for more individualized care. Whether through one-on-one discussion or through mobile technology, it is important for health care providers to find ways to help patients address their emotional concerns and lifestyle behaviors that can act as barriers to good health and well-being.

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Texas A&M researchers confirm value of statewide health and wellness program http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=texas-am-researchers-confirm-value-of-statewide-health-and-wellness-program http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=texas-am-researchers-confirm-value-of-statewide-health-and-wellness-program#comments Wed, 24 Jun 2015 17:01:05 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23786 A team of researchers led by Regents and Distinguished Professor Marcia G. Ory, Ph.D., examines the effectiveness of Texercise Select on physical functioning and quality-of-life outcomes. Researchers collected information on 220 participants 65 years of age and older from eight Texas counties]]>
Older people exercising

The results of the study showed positive improvements in both physical activity and nutrition outcomes.

A statewide program evaluated by researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health can help older adults meet their exercise and nutrition goals.

Texercise Select is a free 12-week program for seniors delivered throughout Texas in various locations from senior centers to faith-based organizations. Trained facilitators lead the program that includes education and discussion on physical activity and nutrition as well as 30-45 minutes of guided exercise.

A team of researchers led by Regents and Distinguished Professor Marcia G. Ory, Ph.D., examined the effectiveness of Texercise Select on physical functioning and quality-of-life outcomes. Researchers collected information on 220 participants 65 years of age and older from eight Texas counties.

Participants were surveyed at the beginning of the program and at completion, using a variety of survey methods to collect data on sociodemographics, health indicators, general health status, physical activity, confidence and social support. Additionally, participants completed a Timed Up-and-Go (TUG) test that measures the time required for participants to rise from a standard arm chair, walk at their typical pace three meters, turn, and walk back to their chair and sit down. The TUG test examines functional mobility and predicts fall risk.

The results of the study showed positive improvements in both physical activity and nutrition outcomes as well as objective functional assessments. Participants increased their likelihood of engaging in strength training and flexibility activities more than four-fold. Further, more than two-thirds of participants had improved TUG test scores, indicating decreased risks for falling and other mobility problems. Additionally, participants engaged in healthier eating practices. After being in the program, participants consumed more fruits and vegetables and increased their water consumption weekly. Participants also increased their self-confidence in making good nutrition choices. Those who completed more sessions had the greatest benefits.

Marcia Ory, Ph.D.

Marcia Ory, Ph.D.

As part of this effort, Alan Stevens, Ph.D., of Baylor Scott and White Healthcare, interviewed program facilitators and providers to better understand factors leading to the success of embedding Texercise Select into existing community and clinical settings.

“Programs such as Texercise Select which are rooted in best practices show great promise for positively impacting large numbers of participants and becoming sustained in communities,” Ory said. “Additional attention should be focused on examining the organizational and programmatic factors that facilitate the wide-spread dissemination and sustainability of effective health promotion programs.”

“Although Texercise has a long history of serving seniors in Texas, more efforts like these are needed to see the impacts of lifestyle improvement programs on the lives of older adults,” said Matthew Lee Smith, Ph.D., assistant professor at the University of Georgia College of Public Health, who was part of the research team.

Research findings were recently published in Frontiers in Public Health Education and Promotion, Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, and Translational Behavioral Medicine: Practice, Policy and Research.

Additional researchers from the Texas A&M School of Public Health include Luohua Jiang, Ph.D., Doris Howell, M.P.H., Shuai Chen, M.S., Jarius Pulczinski and Suzanne Swierc, M.P.H.

For more information on Texercise, see http://www.texercise.com

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Nourished bodies, active minds: Keys to healthy aging http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=nourished-bodies-active-minds-keys-to-healthy-aging http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=nourished-bodies-active-minds-keys-to-healthy-aging#comments Tue, 23 Jun 2015 15:07:54 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23718 Men and women in the U.S. are living longer and enjoying active lifestyles well into their 80’s and 90’s. Numerous studies have confirmed that eating nutritious foods, drinking plenty of water, getting an adequate amount of sleep and staying physically active can make a remarkable difference in the quality of life for older adults. Place yourself on a path to healthy aging with these key recommendations]]>
14244378752_57811a09f9_k

Set a goal to be physically active at least 30 minutes every day. As always, check with your health care provider before starting a new physical activity program.

Men and women in the U.S. are living longer and enjoying active lifestyles well into their 80’s and 90’s. Numerous studies have confirmed that eating nutritious foods, drinking plenty of water, getting an adequate amount of sleep and staying physically active can make a remarkable difference in the quality of life for older adults.

“The advantages of improved nutrition and fitness are benefits you are never too old to enjoy,” said Brenda Bustillos, a registered dietician and doctoral candidate at the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health.

By consuming nutrient-rich foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and engaging in activities that keep you moving, you can feel an immediate difference in your energy levels, strength and general disposition. In fact, as we age the food and activity choices we make become even more essential to our health.

Bustillos emphasizes that healthful foods are not instant cures to health problems but when consumed over time, can support good health throughout the lifespan. You should eat a variety of foods that can help you get the nutrients your body needs as you age. Place yourself on a path to healthy aging with these key recommendations.

Focus on more nutrients and fewer calories.

Older adults need to make every calorie count said Bustillos. Key nutrients for aging include protein, B-vitamins, vitamin D and calcium. For a healthy eating plan, begin with these recommendations from the USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015:

  • Eat fresh, frozen or canned fruits and vegetables. Eat more dark green vegetables, such as leafy greens and broccoli, and orange-colored vegetables, such as carrots and sweet potatoes.
  • Vary your protein choices with more fish, beans, nuts and eggs.
  • Eat at least one serving (approximately 3 ounces) of whole-grain cereals, breads, crackers, rice or pasta every day.
  • Consume three servings of low-fat or fat-free dairy (milk, yogurt 
or cheese) each day. Select dairy products that are fortified with vitamin D to help keep your bones healthy.
  • Choose healthy fats, such as polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats.
  • Switch from preparing food using solid fats, such as butter, lard and shortening, to using canola or olive oils.


Maintenance of mental acuity is an important concern for
many aging adults.

Engaging in mental activities, such as crossword puzzles, cardboard games and reading, can improve brain performance as we age. In addition, studies show foods that may contribute to better brain function, memory and mental alertness include the following:

  • Vegetables – cruciferous (broccoli and cauliflower) and dark leafy (spinach, romaine lettuce, greens)
  • Berries – raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries
  • Fish – salmon, tuna
  • Nuts – walnuts, almonds


If you live on a limited income and have trouble buying enough nutrient-rich foods to meet all your nutritional needs, explore the options for senior meal sites, meals-on-wheels or supplemental nutrition assistance programs (SNAP) in your community.

Your golden years are certainly not the time for drastic weight loss or extreme diets You should aim to eat better while eating less — quality, not quantity. As you age, aim for a stable weight.

“If you feel you need to lose a few pounds, speak with your health provider or a registered dietitian nutritionist about the best plan for you,” Bustillos said. “Your goal should be to lose a little unwanted fat while maintaining strong muscles and bones.”

Stay physically active.

Set a goal to be physically active at least 30 minutes every day. You can split your physical activity into 10-minute sessions throughout the day if a 30-minute block of time is difficult to achieve. If you are not currently active, begin with a few minutes of activity, such as walking, and gradually increase this time as you become stronger. As always, check with your health care provider before starting a new physical activity program.

For more information on nutrition for healthy aging, contact a local registered dietitian or go to eatright.org.

 

Story by Major Brenda D. Bustillos, a registered dietician and doctoral candidate at the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health.

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Center for Community Health Development awarded funding to evaluate Texas smoking cessations programs among Hispanic and LGBT populations http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=center-for-community-health-development-awarded-funding-to-evaluate-texas-smoking-cessations-programs-among-hispanic-and-lgbt-populations http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=center-for-community-health-development-awarded-funding-to-evaluate-texas-smoking-cessations-programs-among-hispanic-and-lgbt-populations#comments Wed, 30 Nov -0001 00:00:00 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23694 The Department of State Health Services has selected the Center for Community Health Development (CCHD) at the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health to develop outreach and evaluation strategies for a program aimed at lowering the disproportionately high rates of smoking among Hispanic and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) populations]]>
person breaking cigarette.

Focus groups with Hispanic and LGBT individuals will be conducted to determine barriers to accessing smoking cessation programs.

The Department of State Health Services has selected the Center for Community Health Development (CCHD) at the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health to develop outreach and evaluation strategies for a program aimed at lowering the disproportionately high rates of smoking among Hispanic and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) populations.

The three-year project will involve research to develop outreach strategies for the Texas Tobacco Quitline, a free, confidential counseling service designed to help people stop smoking. In addition, CCHD will evaluate “The Last Drag” program, a smoking cessation program targeting LGBT smokers.

Approximately $70,000 has been awarded for the initial phase with future additional funding anticipated. The project will be led by Whitney Garney, Ph.D., M.P.H., Texas A&M School of Public Health CCHD Research and Evaluation Associate, and Idethia “Shevon” Harvey, Associate Professor in the Texas A&M Department of Health and Kinesiology and CCHD affiliate faculty member.

Whitney Garney, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Whitney Garney, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Focus groups with Hispanic and LGBT individuals will be conducted to determine barriers to accessing smoking cessation resources like the Texas Tobacco Quitline. From this information, a statewide outreach plan will be developed that Tobacco Prevention and Control Coalitions can use to promote the Quitline service.

CCHD will evaluate the implementation of “The Last Drag” program with LGBT populations in four locations across the state, beginning year one at two universities – Texas State University and the University of Texas at Tyler.

“Increased resources are needed to help decrease the high rates of smoking among Hispanic and LGBT populations,” Garney said. “By gathering input from our target populations, we will be able to work with the state to develop more effective smoking cessation resources.”

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Griffith named Associate Dean for Public Health Practice and Associate Department Head for Public Health Studies http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=griffith-named-associate-dean-for-public-health-practice-and-associate-department-head-for-public-health-studies http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=griffith-named-associate-dean-for-public-health-practice-and-associate-department-head-for-public-health-studies#comments Tue, 16 Jun 2015 15:57:32 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23679 The Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health announced that Jennifer M. Griffith, Dr.P.H., has been named Associate Dean for Public Health Practice and Associate Department Head in the Department of Public Health Studies]]>
Jennifer Griffith, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.

Jennifer Griffith, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.

The Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health announced that Jennifer M. Griffith, Dr.P.H., has been named Associate Dean for Public Health Practice and Associate Department Head in the Department of Public Health Studies.

Griffith previously served as Director of Practice Experiences, Master of Public Health (MPH) Program Director and Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management.

“The role of the Office of Public Health Practice is to facilitate, promote and link academic partners with public health practitioners,” Griffith said. “It is important to stay connected and provide a conduit for the school and practice partners to interact, which simultaneously helps to prepare our graduates to meet public health needs of today and the future.”

In her role as Associate Department Head for Public Health Studies, Griffith, an Associate Professor, will manage and oversee academic programs including curriculum design, delivery and evaluation. The school’s newest department offers its first undergraduate degree, designed to produce graduates ready to address the current public health workforce shortages.

“These two positions complement each other in that by keeping abreast of public health practice needs, I will better be able to work with the department to assure our graduates are knowledgeable and trained with skills to meet public health workforce needs from day one on the job,” Griffith said.

Griffith is a member the Texas A&M School of Public Health inaugural graduating class, receiving her M.P.H. in 2000. She received her Dr.P.H. in 2004 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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The body and the brain: The impact of mental and physical exertion on fatigue development http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=texas-am-researcher-studies-the-impact-of-joint-mental-and-physical-fatigue http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=texas-am-researcher-studies-the-impact-of-joint-mental-and-physical-fatigue#comments Fri, 12 Jun 2015 13:00:11 +0000 https://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=18782 Do you ever notice how stress and mental frustration can affect your physical abilities? Ranjana Mehta, Ph.D., assistant professor at the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health, conducted a study evaluating the interaction between physical and mental fatigue and brain behavior. ]]>
Tired man sitting at a desk and grading papers.

Do you ever notice how stress and mental frustration can affect your physical abilities? This phenomenon is a result of the activation of a specific area of the brain when we attempt to participate in both physical and mental tasks simultaneously.

Do you ever notice how stress and mental frustration can affect your physical abilities? When you are worried about something at work, do you find yourself more exhausted at the end of the day? This phenomenon is a result of the activation of a specific area of the brain when we attempt to participate in both physical and mental tasks simultaneously.

Ranjana Mehta, Ph.D., assistant professor at the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health, conducted a study evaluating the interaction between physical and mental fatigue and brain behavior.

The study showed that when we attempt mental tasks and physical tasks at the same time, we activate specific areas, called prefrontal cortex (PFC), in our brain. This can cause our bodies to become fatigued much sooner than if we were solely participating in a physical task.

Typically, endurance and fatigue have been examined solely from a physical perspective, focused primarily on the body and muscles used to complete a specific task. However, the brain is just like any other biological tissue, it can be overused and can suffer from fatigue.

“Existing examinations of physical and mental fatigue has been limited to evaluating cardiovascular, muscular and biomechanical changes,” said Mehta. “The purpose of this study was to use simultaneous monitoring of brain and muscle function to examine the impact on the PFC while comparing the changes in brain behavior with traditional measures of fatigue.”

According to Mehta, study findings show that there were lower blood oxygen levels in the PFC following combined physical and mental fatigue compared to that of just physical fatigue conditions. Through simultaneous examination of the brain and muscle function it is apparent that when participating in highly cognitive tasks, brain resources are divided which may accelerate the development of physical fatigue.

It is critical that researchers consider the brain as well as the body when examining fatigue development and its impact on the body. Interdisciplinary work that combines neurocognitive principles with physiological and biomechanical outcomes can provide us with a comprehensive understanding of what is happening to the body when we perform our daily activities.

“Not a lot of people see the value in looking at both the brain and the body together,” said Mehta. “However, no one does purely physical or mental work; they always do both.”

This study was published online in Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Co-author of the study is Raja Parasuraman, Ph.D., professor of psychology at George Mason University in Virginia.

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Texas A&M Health Science Center celebrates largest graduating class in history http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=texas-am-health-science-center-celebrates-largest-graduating-class-in-history http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=texas-am-health-science-center-celebrates-largest-graduating-class-in-history#comments Thu, 11 Jun 2015 13:18:59 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23639 Texas A&M Health Science Center graduated 639 students at commencement ceremonies across the state last month. This is the largest graduating class to date, and is indicative of Texas A&M’s commitment to educate exceptional health care leaders in medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, public health and medical sciences]]>

Graduates gig 'emAddressing the need for highly trained state and national health care professionals, Texas A&M Health Science Center graduated 645 students at commencement ceremonies across the state last month. This is the largest graduating class to date, and is indicative of Texas A&M’s commitment to educate exceptional health care leaders in medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, public health and medical sciences.

“As the health care landscape continues to grow and change, so do the needs of our patient populations, but one thing remains the same – the need for compassionate and skilled providers and leaders with a desire to serve,” said Paul E. Ogden, M.D., interim executive vice president and CEO of the Texas A&M Health Science Center. “That desire to serve and the mindset of leading by example is innately Aggie, and is exactly what the members of the Texas A&M Health Science Center Class of 2015 embody as the next generation of health care professionals.”

Graduates for each college are as follows:

Texas A&M College of Medicine – 184 students received a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.), 11 a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and one a Master of Science (M.S.) in Medical Sciences.

Since graduating its first class in 1981, the college has welcomed more than 2,200 Aggie Doctors to the work force, with 64 percent choosing to stay in Texas and half of all Texas A&M College of Medicine graduates entering into primary care. The College of Medicine also exceeds the national benchmark with a 97 percent pass rate on the national medical licensing exam.

Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry – 93 students received a Doctor of Dental Surgery (D.D.S.), 30 a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Dental Hygiene, 2 students receiving an additional PhD and 45 students with graduate’s degrees and certificates in specialty programs.

The college has the highest percent of under-represented minority students in the nation, and nearly one-third of all dentists in Texas are graduates of the Texas A&M Baylor College of Dentistry.

Texas A&M College of Nursing – 112 students received a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.). Since its opening in 2008, the college has produced more than 500 nurses to help in addressing the state and nation’s critical nursing shortage. The Texas A&M College of Nursing holds special commendation status from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board for pass rate excellence.

Texas A&M Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy – 84 students received a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.). The College of Pharmacy ranks in the Top 50 “Best Grad Schools for Pharmacy” by U.S. News & World Report, and to date, more than half of the college’s graduates remain in South Texas to practice.

Texas A&M School of Public Health – 45 students received a Master of Public Health (M.P.H.), 35 a Master of Health Administration (M.H.A), two a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) and one a Doctor of Public Health (D.R.P.H.). The school ranks in the Top 25 “Best Grad Schools for Public Health” by U.S. News & World Report.

Texas A&M Health Science Center’s enrollment across its five colleges and eight statewide campus locations totaled 2,467 students in 2014.

Story by Jonathan Knechtel.

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Dean Jay Maddock appointed to Department of State Health Services committee http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=dean-jay-maddock-appointed-to-department-of-state-health-services-committee http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=dean-jay-maddock-appointed-to-department-of-state-health-services-committee#comments Wed, 10 Jun 2015 20:34:00 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23632 Jay Maddock, Ph.D., Dean of the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health, has been selected to serve as a member of the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) Public Health Funding and Policy Committee established by Senate Bill 969 in the 82nd Texas Legislative Session]]>
Jay Maddock, Ph.D.

Jay Maddock, Ph.D.

Jay Maddock, Ph.D., Dean of the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health, has been selected to serve as a member of the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) Public Health Funding and Policy Committee established by Senate Bill 969 in the 82nd Texas Legislative Session.

“We are privileged to have the benefit of Dr. Maddock’s expertise and experience in advising the department on public health funding and policy issues in Texas,” said Kirk Cole, Interim DSHS Commissioner.

The committee will make recommendations on various issues relating to local health entities, such as local health units, local health departments and public health districts. The recommendations will relate to funding and communications between the entities and DSHS, as well as more general public health policy issues facing the state.

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