Vital Record » Medicine http://news.tamhsc.edu Your source for health news from the Texas A&M Health Science Center Thu, 28 May 2015 00:22:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Internet a tool, not replacement, for physician http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=internet-a-tool-not-replacement-for-physician http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=internet-a-tool-not-replacement-for-physician#comments Wed, 27 May 2015 17:30:45 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?p=10863 We’re using the Internet more than ever – checking email, reading up on the latest news and sports scores, even obtaining health information. But regardless what we find about a malady or illness that may be affecting us or someone else, going online does not replace a personal consultation with a physician, says the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine]]>

Person sitting at computerWe’re using the Internet more than ever – checking email, reading up on the latest news and sports scores, even obtaining health information. But regardless what we find about a malady or illness that may be affecting us or someone else, going online does not replace a personal consultation with a physician.

“Your physician adds the human element,” says Kory Gill, D.O., a Texas A&M Physician and assistant professor of family and community medicine at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. “Your diagnosis reached through the Internet may be wrong, or there may be some particular reason you should not use a certain Internet-recommended treatment that you’re not aware of.”

But that doesn’t stop us from looking. According to the Pew Internet & American Life Project, 80 percent of Internet users, or 59 percent of U.S. adults, look online for health information. Another 17 percent of cell phone owners, or 15 percent of adults, have done the same. The most often researched topics are specific diseases or conditions, treatments or procedures, and doctors or other health professionals.

“The Internet is easier and cheaper than going to your doctor,” Dr. Gill says. “There are thousands of sites offering varied advice – some good, some bad, some even potentially harmful. In fact, there is a recent study that shows those using the Internet had higher rates of depression, which may be due to increased rumination, unnecessary alarm or over-attention to health problems.”

According to Dr. Gill, use the Internet to do “homework” before visiting your doctor. And be concise as possible.

“When patients come prepared, it actually helps the visit be more productive,” Dr. Gill says. “We don’t waste time on the simple questions they were able to find on their own, and therefore get to address their more complex issues. And when they come prepared, they’re less likely to leave and later say, ‘Oh, I wish I would have asked this.’ ”

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6 tips for better sleep http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=6-tips-for-better-sleep http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=6-tips-for-better-sleep#comments Tue, 19 May 2015 13:15:21 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23291 Getting a good night's rest can be pretty challenging. Even if you know you're tired, sometimes falling asleep feels like an impossible task. This guide contains six easy tips for those of you that struggle with insomnia or other annoying sleep issues. Find out what you're doing that could be hindering you body's ability to shut down at night]]>

Learn more about sleep disorders and what may be causing you to stay awake at night.

BetterSleep-02

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Texas A&M researchers looking to microbiota to advance personalized medicine http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=texas-am-researchers-looking-to-microbiota-to-advance-personalized-medicine http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=texas-am-researchers-looking-to-microbiota-to-advance-personalized-medicine#comments Mon, 11 May 2015 14:21:27 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23392 Robert Alaniz, Ph.D.

Robert Alaniz, Ph.D., assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine, recently received a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to focus on understanding how the microbiota regulate T-cells.

The microbiota, which is comprised of the microorganisms that live in and on humans, has recently become a popular topic with both scientists and the general public, alike. While microbes in general are often seen as the “bad guys” – and the recent Ebola outbreak does not help this interpretation – there is an essential partnership between humans and microbes that showcases the beneficial relationship in metabolic health, immunity, gut function, colorectal cancer, and even behavior.

This host-microbiota connection serves as the driving force for a multi-institutional team of researchers led by Robert Alaniz, Ph.D., assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine. Their work, which recently received a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), focuses on understanding how the microbiota regulate T-cells, which are meant to help protect your body. But for people with autoimmune diseases, like colitis, immune responses can attack their own cell – which is where Alaniz and his team come in. Their research will educate the T-cells to only provide protection from inflammation, and in turn, prevent disease.

“We hope that these studies will lead to the development of a model to create a personalized approach that is tailored for each individual patient rather than trying to make the patient fit the treatment,” Alaniz said. “We are essentially looking at ways to create personalized cellular immunotherapy to re-educate our own T-cells so that they regulate autoimmune diseases.”

By leveraging the unique collaborations of scientists on this project, the team is able to model optimal growth and conditioning of T-cells, which expedites discovery of how the cell will respond once infused in a person. These findings will serve to enhance the microbiota’s role as an active participant in supporting overall health.

Other members of the research team include Dr. Arul Jayaraman, professor in the Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University and Dr. Juergen Hahn of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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Cheers to your health: How alcohol affects your body http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=cheers-to-your-health-how-alcohol-affects-your-body http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=cheers-to-your-health-how-alcohol-affects-your-body#comments Wed, 06 May 2015 15:20:57 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23340 Summer is just around the corner, which means parties, vacations and holidays. With these fun, relaxing events, it’s not uncommon to unwind and celebrate with a drink in hand. Moderation is key in most things, but is especially important when it comes to consuming alcoholic beverages. A couple of drinks can leave you feeling in a comfortable place, but have you ever wondered what effects overindulging in alcohol can have on your body immediately, or even a few years down the line]]>

Summer is just around the corner, which means parties, vacations and holidays. With these fun, relaxing events, it’s not uncommon to unwind and celebrate with a drink in hand. Moderation is key in most things, but is especially important when it comes to consuming alcoholic beverages. A couple of drinks can leave you feeling in a comfortable place, but have you ever wondered what effects overindulging in alcohol can have on your body immediately, or even a few years down the line?

To answer some of the questions you may never have thought to ask, Joshua Cabrera, M.D., assistant professor at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, shines some light on some of the lesser-known effects of alcohol.

Chilled mixed drink topped with cherries and an orange peal, sitting on a bar.

Drinking is a normal part of our social culture, but when heavy consumption of alcohol becomes a habit, sever health complication can arise.

The more you drink, the less you think

The most common part of our body that is affected almost immediately by alcohol is the brain. “After a few drinks, our brains’ processing speeds begin to slow down, which translates into slower reaction times,” Cabrera said. “But how much you’re affected depends on your Blood Alcohol Content (BAC).”

Mild to moderate consumption of alcohol interferes with decision-making abilities and lowers inhibitions. Even mild alcohol consumption can lead to a longer glare recovery time, which is the time necessary to readjust our eyes after they are exposed to bright lights. Additionally, moderate to heavy drinking will lead to some of the more commonly known physiological effects: slurred speech, slower reflexes and lethargy.

“The more drinks a person has had, and the higher their BAC is, the higher the risk that the person will injure themselves or others, especially in high-risk situations that require more coordination and reflexes, such as driving,” Cabrera explained. “Whenever alcohol is involved, accidents are more likely to occur, but once the legal limit (0.08 percent BAC) is surpassed, that risk increases at greatly.”

Cabrera warns that although one to two drinks won’t have many long-term health effects on the body, binge drinking (or a pattern of drinking that brings BAC levels to 0.08 percent or higher) is dangerous. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), low-risk drinking is defined at no more than three drinks in a day and seven during the week for women, and four drinks a day (not to exceed 14 drinks per week) for men.

Wasting away in Margaritaville

Drinking is a normal part of social culture for many, and it’s not necessary to swear it off completely, unless you have a personal reason for doing so. However, when the occasional drink turns into four or more on most days, serious long-term health complications may arise.

“While there are a number of factors, both genetic and environmental, that can contribute to alcoholism, a largely overlooked component is simply the frequency and degree of consumption. The more often someone drinks heavily, the more likely it is they’ll develop a dependency,” Cabrera stated.

While most people are familiar with the more immediate effects drinking can have on the body, over the course of time, an alcohol addiction can lead to severe health conditions even beyond the commonly known impacts on the kidneys and liver.

In the short-run, high doses of alcohol can make it difficult to recall certain events that occur during the time of consumption and a period after. However, the effects on the brain and memory don’t stop there; after years of heavy consumption of alcohol, drinking can lead to irreversible damage to the structure and function of the brain.

Those who drink heavily are at risk for developing alcoholic cardiomyopathy or arrhythmias. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy causes the heart muscle to weaken and makes it difficult for the heart to pump blood effectively, which can lead to severe damage to organs and tissues. Alcohol-induced arrhythmias are irregular or rapid heartbeats that occur when alcohol interferes with the body’s internal pacemaker. Arrhythmias can cause blood clots to form, increasing individuals’ risk for a stroke or heart attack.

A chaser of good news

You don’t have to completely refrain from alcoholic beverages in order to avoid these frightening, long-term complications, though. Regular, low-risk drinking won’t doom you won’t lead to cirrhosis of the liver or any of these serious conditions; in fact, in low doses, it’s been proven that some forms of drinking may improve your health. Recently, it was discovered that a component in grapes and red wine might help guard against memory loss.  Even the heart-healthy Mediterranean Diet allows for that evening glass of wine. The NIAAA reports that people who drink a moderate amount have a lower risk of developing coronary heart disease than their non-drinking counterparts. This is because moderate drinking can inhibit and reduce the accumulation of fat in the arteries.

While the long-term, negative effects of alcohol are usually brought on by consistent and heavy drinking patterns, it is always important to practice safe habits. Cabrera suggests limiting intake to one drink per hour and remembering to eat before consuming any alcohol. Always be sure to have a designated driver or another sober method of transportation to take you home if you plan to drink at an event or party.

For more information on safe practices and how alcohol can affect your body, visit the NIAAA website.

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Samuel Named College of Medicine Wofford Cain Chair in Infectious Disease http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=samuel-named-college-of-medicine-wofford-cain-chair-in-infectious-disease http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=samuel-named-college-of-medicine-wofford-cain-chair-in-infectious-disease#comments Wed, 06 May 2015 14:20:35 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23332 Samuel has been an integral part of the College of Medicine faculty since 1994 and has led the Department of Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology as Department Chair since 2010 down a productive and innovative path. With the addition of this Chair, all basic science departments in the College of Medicine now have endowed chair positions aimed at significantly enhancing the mission of the College of Medicine]]>

Dr. James SamuelJames Samuel, Ph.D., professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine and chair of the Department of Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology, was recently named the Wofford Cain Chair in Infectious Disease.

Samuel has been an integral part of the College of Medicine faculty since 1994 and has led the Department of Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology as Department Chair since 2010 down a productive and innovative path. With the addition of this Chair, all basic science departments in the College of Medicine now have endowed chair positions aimed at significantly enhancing the mission of the College of Medicine.

Samuel received his undergraduate degree from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, and a master’s degree and Ph.D. from Washington State University in Pullman, Wash.  He received post-doctoral training at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Md., and worked in the Biotechnology arena for Battelle Memorial Institute and MicroCarb, Inc., prior to joining the College of Medicine.  He has authored more than 92 peer reviewed manuscripts and is a national and international expert on Q fever. He has had the honor to serve as primary mentor/graduate chair for 15 graduate students, 16 post-doctoral fellows and membership on more than 50 graduate committees while in the College of Medicine.  He has maintained a consistently funded research program on Q fever from the National Institutes of Health and Department of Defense while providing significant service to grant and manuscript review. Previous honors include College of Medicine Senior Research Award (2010) and President of the American Society of Rickettsiology (2007-2009).

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College of Medicine and LiveBeyond Partner Together to Teach CPR & AED Training in Haiti for President Martelly’s Staff http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=college-of-medicine-and-livebeyond-partner-together-to-teach-cpr-aed-training-in-haiti-for-president-martellys-staff http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=college-of-medicine-and-livebeyond-partner-together-to-teach-cpr-aed-training-in-haiti-for-president-martellys-staff#comments Wed, 06 May 2015 13:06:10 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23334 Jerry Livingston , Ph.D., M.S.N, RN, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine, recently returned from Haiti with far fewer bags than he left with. He travelled to Haiti lugging eight CPR mannequins, eight valve masks, several automated external defibrillators (AED) and many other supplies needed to teach CPR and AED courses to the staff and security teams of Haiti President Michel Martelly and his wife, Sophia]]>

COM students and professor teaching in HaitiJerry Livingston , Ph.D., M.S.N, RN, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine, recently returned from Haiti with far fewer bags than he left with. He travelled to Haiti lugging eight CPR mannequins, eight valve masks, several automated external defibrillators (AED) and many other supplies needed to teach CPR and AED courses to the staff and security teams of Haiti President Michel Martelly and his wife, Sophia.

The Haiti-based, humanitarian organization, LiveBeyond, and Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, hosted CPR & AED trainings at the presidential palace and several hospitals and nursing schools in and around Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

The courses were taught by Livingston and coordinated by College of Medicine Adjunct Assistant Professor David Vanderpool, M.D., CEO and founder of LiveBeyond. Two fourth-year Texas A&M medical students, Anthony Pickrel and Jade Kumar, demonstrated proper technique and assisted with one-on-one teachings with the attendants.

In Port-au-Prince, Haiti, there is not an option to call 911 in an emergency situation. This training course provided the presidential staff with the knowledge and skills to perform CPR and AED operations in the event of emergency situations.

Haiti lacks a health care infrastructure, and in remote areas, medical care resources are even more limited. LiveBeyond and Texas A&M College of Medicine want to not only help treat the people of Haiti, but help develop the health care providers of the region to further expand the reach of preventative measures and treatment capabilities.

“The health care in Haiti is something most people in the U.S. could never imagine,” Livingston said. “Very few people have access to health care, and once they can access it, chances are they may not receive the help they need. By giving providers the tools to accurately perform even simple things, like CPR, we are saving lives in Haiti and planting the seeds for continued growth and development for health care in Haiti.”

Along with educating the president’s staff, several other medical groups from around the area received training, totaling 125 health care workers. Medics with a newly added medical flight program, nurses at a local hospital, and local nursing students from a Port-au-Prince nursing school all participated in the training courses throughout the week.

“For many, this was the first time they were learning basic life support skills, and they all were very engaged with the lessons,” Pickrel said. “I believe our CPR team empowered these individuals with a new skill set that will benefit many Haitians in the future. The LiveBeyond organization is doing a tremendous job to improve the health of Haitians, not only providing medical care to locals but also educating the providers.”

Livingston also created a manual to accompany the trainings, available in both English and French. And all participants of the programs received certificates from the College of Medicine, signed by Paul Ogden, M.D., interim dean of the College of Medicine.

“The staff will leave this training equipped with the ability to perform life-saving skills in critical events,” Vanderpool said. “In emergency situations, every second matters, and they will now be equipped with the ability to deliver cardiac life support.”

Vanderpool added, “The value of this type of education is infinite. Whether it’s a Haitian medical professional or one of President Martelly’s staff members, this knowledge is a sustainable product that they will able to indefinitely use and teach others to save more lives in Haiti.”

In addition to helping the people of Haiti, this partnership allows medical students from the Texas A&M Health Science Center to experience something they could never see in the United States and it expands not only their education, but their humanitarian approach and understanding of the needs of patients across populations.

“This is something they’d never experience back home or in the classroom,” Livingston said. “While there is an immediate educational opportunity here for students to learn, we’re also really excited about creating and instilling within our students an understanding of all people and their need for health care. An experience like this goes far beyond anything we could provide them in the classroom, and we feel this will make the best doctors possible.”

“While our original intention of going to Haiti was for a medical mission trip, it turned out to be so much more,” Kumar said. “We learned firsthand that accessible medical care is a necessity to improve the lives of the underserved, but also that a focus on education and global partnerships are just as vital to growth and development.”

Kumar and Pickrel were in Haiti for a month working with LiveBeyond as a mission trip partnership between the organization and the College of Medicine. Kumar said of the CPR/AED training, “Teaching nurses, security personnel, and even doctors to help themselves and others was an eye-opening experience because it revealed just how much we take for granted in a country with health care infrastructure like the United States.”

Livingston further explained that the CPR and AED courses taught this April were a pilot program to launch a series of courses in Haiti, to be held quarterly, and later expand into an interprofessional health care mission between the College of Medicine and College of Nursing.

“I hope every Texas A&M medical student will have a similar opportunity in the future,” Pickrel said. “This experience forced me out of my comfort zone and showed me what medicine is like for so many of the world’s people.  It was an eye-opening experience, and my overall perspective of the world is forever changed.”

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Medicine professor honored with Bush Excellence Award for Public Service http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=medicine-professor-honored-with-bush-excellence-award-for-public-service http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=medicine-professor-honored-with-bush-excellence-award-for-public-service#comments Mon, 04 May 2015 22:00:13 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23317 Barbara Gastel, M.D., professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine and College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences recently received the Bush Excellence Award for Faculty in Public Service. Gastel has pioneered programs that teach science writing and editing to researchers and medical professionals in China, Mexico, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Rwanda, Ghana, and other developing and emerging countries]]>

Barbara Gastel, M.D., professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine and College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences recently received the Bush Excellence Award for Faculty in Public Service.

barbara gastel

Barbara Gastel, M.D., professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine and College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences recently received the Bush Excellence Award for Faculty in Public Service.

The award is given annually by the Bush Presidential Library Foundation to recognize a Texas A&M University faculty member who makes outstanding contributions to public service, defined as a sustained long-term application of a faculty member’s disciplinary expertise to the public or non-profit sector in local, state, national, or international arenas.

Gastel has pioneered programs that teach science writing and editing to researchers and medical professionals in China, Mexico, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Rwanda, Ghana, and other developing and emerging countries. Gastel co-led the China Medical Board Program in Biomedical Writing for more than a decade, which included yearly delivery of a two-semester course in biomedical writing at multiple leading health science centers throughout Asia from 1996 until 2007.

Also, since its inception in 2007, she has been a member of the leadership team of AuthorAID, a project to help researchers in developing countries write about and publish their work. For the past seven summers, Gastel has also led an intensive three-week course in research writing, mainly for researchers from Mexico and other countries.

“Public service through promoting effective science communication has long been a major part of my activity as a faculty member,” Gastel said. “Having completed more than a quarter century of such service, I am happy to be observing its long-term impact and especially to be seeing the impact amplified by those I have mentored or trained. Although such service is its own reward, I am honored to win the Bush Excellence Award for Faculty in Public Service.”

Gastel’s previous prestigious honors include the 2012 Texas A&M Association of Former Students Award in Extension, Outreach, Continuing Education & Professional Development and the 2010 John P. McGovern Science and Society Award, which is given by the international research society Sigma Xi. The McGovern Award recognizes individuals who are prominent spokespersons for the public understanding and appreciation of science, with other past winners including Condoleezza Rice and Norman E. Borlaug.

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Center for Epigenetics and Disease Prevention receives Texas A&M Board of Regents stamp of approval http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=center-for-epigenetics-and-disease-prevention-receives-texas-am-board-of-regents-stamp-of-approval http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=center-for-epigenetics-and-disease-prevention-receives-texas-am-board-of-regents-stamp-of-approval#comments Fri, 01 May 2015 14:23:56 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23299 The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents has officially approved establishment of the Texas A&M Center for Epigenetics and Disease Prevention as an organizational unit under the Texas A&M Health Science Center Institute of Biosciences and Technology. The formal recognition will play a large role in the two-year-old center’s future growth as it aims to develop treatments using naturally occurring compounds to prevent and manage diseases]]>
Roderick H. Dashwood, director of the Texas A&M Center for Epigenetics & Disease Prevention.

Roderick H. Dashwood, director of the Texas A&M Center for Epigenetics & Disease Prevention.

The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents has officially approved establishment of the Texas A&M Center for Epigenetics and Disease Prevention (CEDP) as an organizational unit under the Texas A&M Health Science Center Institute of Biosciences and Technology. The formal recognition will play a large role in the two-year-old center’s future growth as it aims to develop treatments using naturally occurring compounds to prevent and manage diseases.

“We are incredibly excited about the opportunity to grow this center and its novel approach to natural treatments, which hold great promise in the fields of medicine and preventative health,” said Brett Giroir, M.D., CEO of Texas A&M Health Science Center.

Led by Roderick H. Dashwood, Ph.D., an expert in epigenetics and dietary cancer prevention, the CEDP takes an innovative approach to disease prevention by implementing a “field-to-clinic” paradigm. This initiative integrates nutrition, chemistry and medicine to transform current approaches to cancer, metabolic disorders and other chronic conditions, by exploring treatments that utilize beneficial agents found naturally in food, such as compounds found in broccoli that guard against prostate cancer.

The center was established in 2013 with support from the Chancellor’s Research Initiative (CRI) and other institutions from the Texas A&M System in order to address new forms of preventative medicine. Currently, the CEDP receives funding from the CRI and various institutes within the Texas A&M System, totaling $9.1 million over five years, and receives over $10 million more in additional funding from the U.S. National Cancer Institute and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.

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Texas A&M Health Science Center partners with St. Joseph Health System to customize health and wellness care for seniors http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=texas-am-health-science-center-partners-with-st-joseph-health-system-to-customize-health-and-wellness-care-for-seniors http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post=texas-am-health-science-center-partners-with-st-joseph-health-system-to-customize-health-and-wellness-care-for-seniors#comments Wed, 29 Apr 2015 17:41:53 +0000 http://news.tamhsc.edu/?post_type=post&p=23242 New partnership will provide a forum for research to improve the unique health care techniques for aging populations and utilize a team approach to further the common mission of supporting the overall health and wellness of our community]]>

Doctor examining a senior patient.The Texas A&M Health Science Center and St. Joseph Health System have partnered to develop a health and wellness center in Bryan, Texas, devoted to seniors. Known as the MatureWell Lifestyle Center, this two-story, 23,000-square-footcomplex will offer a single destination for healthy seniors to achieve their wellness goals and a platform to expand health care research and education for mature populations.

Conveniently located adjacent to the Texas A&M Biocorridor – a burgeoning epicenter of biotech development anchored by the Texas A&M Health Science Center Bryan campus – the MatureWell Lifestyle Center will complement the area’s array of developing retail and business entities that are customized to meet the unique needs of seniors and the professional community. While the amenities of the Center are still being developed, plans are underway to break ground later this year.

The partnership will providing a forum for research to improve the unique health care techniques for aging populations and utilize a team approach through interdisciplinary experiences at Texas A&M Health Science Center, led by the Texas A&M College of Medicine. This is exciting progress on the part of both St. Joseph and Texas A&M Health Science Center to further the common mission of supporting the overall health and wellness of our community.

“As we continue to develop the Texas A&M Biocorridor as a national center for innovation and health transformation, we remain committed to advancing programs that benefit our patients and the health of our community,” said Brett Giroir, M.D., CEO of Texas A&M Health Science Center. “The MatureWell Lifestyle Center, in partnership with St. Joseph, is a priority project that will enable the highest quality inter-professional resources from Texas A&M Health Science Center – including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and public health professionals – to significantly improve the longevity and quality of life for our growing senior population. This efforts represents the first of many new initiatives for our faculty and students that will develop and implement novel clinical care delivery initiatives, including subspecialty programs, in collaboration with our clinical partner institutions.”

The St. Joseph MatureWell Lifestyle Center in partnership with Texas A&M Health Science Center will offer a single destination where seniors can achieve their health and wellness goals through a full range of services including health care specialists focused on the unique needs of older adults, a fitness area, diagnostic services, and an onsite pharmacy for prescriptions and medication education.

“The College of Medicine is fully committed to improving care for our geriatric patients, and will use this opportunity to improve the systems of care, diagnosis and management of geriatric patients. The goal is to keep the mature population active, healthy and vibrant in the community,” said Paul Ogden, M.D., interim dean of the Texas A&M College of Medicine. “Geriatric care is evolving. We will ensure that our students receive the best geriatric education, and that our faculty, and Texas A&M University can use applied research to provide the best care possible in partnership with the St. Joseph Health System.”

Baby boomers make up about 78 million Americans. As the oldest of them are now hitting retirement age, many have additional medical needs, which will have a marked impact on the U.S. health care system. As such, health care providers across the country are seeking opportunities to advance preventative care and effectively control chronic diseases before the “Silver Tsunami” hits.

“As more and more seniors move to Bryan/College Station to retire, and baby boomers continue to age, this new center puts us at the forefront of changing the way these individuals can achieve their wellness and lifestyle goals right here in our community,” said Kathy Krusie, CEO, St. Joseph Regional Health Center.

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